In A Conversation with Mr Lin, Shaun

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Attended a Sharing on Private Wealth Management by Mr Lin, an USP alumnus.

The USP synopsis explains Mr Lin's background far better than I could:

"There is huge money in Private Wealth Management. You schmooze with society’s elite, you dine at exclusive restaurants, you cruise in luxury vehicles, you may even have personal relationships with the stars... but is there a darker side to it all?

Join us as one of our USP Alumni shares his story of challenges and dilemmas in “making it” in the tough world of Wealth Management and what he feels it means to be truly successful both at work and in life! An exciting and honest exploration, this session will be excellent for students interested to find out if Wealth Management is indeed a career for them.

Shaun Lin has been with Standard Chartered Bank since 2004, during his 7 years with SCB, he has gone from being a Personal Financial Consultant to a Priority Banking Relationship Manager and Branch Manager before moving to The Standard Chartered Private Bank as Senior Associate Director, Business Management and Special Projects, SEA. Most recently Shaun was posted to Shanghai as Head Of Business Planning and Development, and has spent the last 14 months managing the China Private Banking business. Shaun’s experience spans frontline sales & management, operational risk, business development and general management.

He is a regular speaker at both NUS and SMU since 2008 and has been invited to sit on several independent think tanks and feedback units since 2008. During his free time, Shaun is a car enthusiast and enjoys racing performance cars in Singapore and Malaysia. He currently owns two performance cars that he proudly declares are street legal! Shaun also enjoys distance running and takes part in the SCB Singapore Marathon annually. He also works with a number of volunteer organisations on a regular basis."
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Unlike students from China, India and/or NUS Business School, I did not pose any questions or networked. I simply stood in a corner, quiet as a mickey mouse.

If I were to exercise my rudimentary psych understanding on myself, I'd say that I was feeling inferior and out-of-place. A Science student, attending a business talk? Such audacity! In my mind, I could imagine myself being judged and found wanting.

I wasn't really interested in private fund management. I wasn't that interested in pursuing dollars and cents. I was simply interested in the way some people are interested in watching movies or stalking strangers on Facebook. I was interested because I just was.
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At the end of the talk, Mr Lin was surrounded by a knot of fervent listeners.

From the questions posed, I couldn't help feeling that the group missed his heartfelt message - to pay equal attention to both the tangible and intangible aspects of life.
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Mr Lin found a mentor in Mr Viswa Sadasivan, a Nominated Member of the Parliament.

Apparently, Mr Viswa made a speech highlighting what was wrong with Singapore and compelled MM Lee to speak for the first time in 2 years during a parliamentary debate. Just reading up on Mr Viswa's background makes me like the man already. Google his name, please.

The main takeaway:

There are five pillars that define success.
1) Material wealth
2) Cordial partnerships with colleagues and subordinates
3) Close relationships with family
4) Sustained friendships
5) Power
These five pillars cannot be built sequentially, but must be done so simultaneously. Miss any of the supporting beams and life becomes a misery.

A very modern interpretation of success. Perhaps I'm not ready to digest it.
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An enjoyable and insightful seminar. Mr Lin spoke well, with charisma and humour.

As with delectable dishes, one did not know what are the ingredients; one simply recognised the mastery of it all. The main lessons to be learnt was rather sketchy but that was a feeling that something useful was acquired - but what exactly is that useful something?

A little pensive, a little disturbed.
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Lessons for self:
1) speak up before the lecturer has to leave (don't be painfully shy)
2) interact with fellow participants after seminar (don't be so painfully shy x 2)
3) pay equal attention to all aspects of your life
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Emailed Mr Lin and he replied. Quite a pleasant surprise :]

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